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Mentoring Students to Create High Quality Science Projects
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FREE Clock Hours for Teachers! From making structured observations to communicating scientific results in a poster presentation, this 4‐hr course will cover the fundamentals of how scientists develop projects.

3/28/2015
When: 3/28/2015
9:30 AM
Where: Bremerton High School
1500 13th Street
Bremerton, Washington  98337
United States
Contact: Gary Foss

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Mentoring Students to Create High Quality Science Projects

FREE Clock Hours for Teachers!

9:30 to 3:30 Saturday March 28, 2015

Washington State Science and Engineering Fair

1500 13th Street, Bremerton, WA 98337

 

From making structured observations to communicating scientific results in a poster presentation, this 4hr course will cover the fundamentals of how scientists develop projects. We will walk participants through the development of a science research project by learning how to ask a testable research questioncollect and analyze quantitative data, and display the four parts of a scientific report. We’ll answer questions such as “Why do you need to replicate your project?” and “What’s the difference between the results and the discussion?” The course will help parents and teachers guide students in producing independent science research projects while meeting the Washington State education standards.

Components of the workshop will include:

·         Making observations and asking a testable research question.

 

·         Presentations and example posters describing research conducted at the University of Washington and through USDA Forest Service Research and Development.

 

·         Subtleties of designing research  methods: Controls, replication, sample size

 

·         What to  do with your data: Averages, graphs and statistics

 

·         Interpretation and Inference, drawing valid conclusions.

 

·         Mini-hands-on research project.

 

This won’t be a workshop on how science fair projects are judged but rather, a handson explanation of how high quality science projects are conceived, conducted, and communicated. After the workshop, participants should be able to guide students in critiquing scientific reports in the news, crafting testable research questions on any topic, and putting it all together in a clear and scientific poster.

 

Instructors: Kathryn Kelsey, Ph.D. Kathryn is a Science Teacher with the Seattle Public Schools and helps organize the Seattle Middle School Science and Engineering Fair. She has over two decades of science classroom experience.

Ashley Steel, Ph.D., is a quantitative ecologist and statistician with the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station. She  explores data from a wide variety of science topics and has been collecting and publishing her own data since the early 1990s.

Together, Kathryn and Ashley cowrote “The Truth About Science: A Curriculum for Developing Young Scientists” published in 2001 by NSTA Press and “Ecology by Inquiry” available online at  http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/education/. They have designed and presented dozens of workshops to help teachers understand how scientists think and how real science is conducted, including a 3credit course through UW Extension.

 

FREE Clock Hours and lunch provided by the Washington State Science and Engineering Fair.

 

To register, email gary.c.foss@boeing.com

 





Employment Notices
If you have a job opening and you would like to advertise it for free on WSTA.NET, please send the advertisement to webmaster and we will post it!  Please make sure the advertisement is in ASCII Text (no PDFs or other attachments).  Listings will be posted for 60 days.

Mentoring Students to Create High Quality Science Projects

FREE Clock Hours for Teachers!


9:30 to 3:30 Saturday March 28, 2015

Washington State Science and Engineering Fair

1500 13th Street, Bremerton, WA 9833

 

From making structured observations to communicating scientific results in a poster presentation, this 4hr course will cover the fundamentals of how scientists develop projects. We will walk participants through the development of a science research project by learning how to ask a testable research questioncollect and analyze quantitative data, and display the four parts of a scientific report. We’ll answer questions such as “Why do you need to replicate your project?” and “What’s the difference between the results and the discussion?” The course will help parents and teachers guide students in producing independent science research projects while meeting the Washington State education standards.

Components of the workshop will include:

·         Making observations and asking a testable research question.

 

·         Presentations and example posters describing research conducted at the University of Washington and through USDA Forest Service Research and Development.

 

·         Subtleties of designing research  methods: Controls, replication, sample size

 

·         What to  do with your data: Averages, graphs and statistics

 

·         Interpretation and Inference, drawing valid conclusions.

 

·         Mini-hands-on research project.

 

This won’t be a workshop on how science fair projects are judged but rather, a handson explanation of how high quality science projects are conceived, conducted, and communicated. After the workshop, participants should be able to guide students in critiquing scientific reports in the news, crafting testable research questions on any topic, and putting it all together in a clear and scientific poster.

 

Instructors: Kathryn Kelsey, Ph.D. Kathryn is a Science Teacher with the Seattle Public Schools and helps organize the Seattle Middle School Science and Engineering Fair. She has over two decades of science classroom experience.

Ashley Steel, Ph.D., is a quantitative ecologist and statistician with the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station. She  explores data from a wide variety of science topics and has been collecting and publishing her own data since the early 1990s.

Together, Kathryn and Ashley cowrote “The Truth About Science: A Curriculum for Developing Young Scientists” published in 2001 by NSTA Press and “Ecology by Inquiry” available online athttp://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/education/. They have designed and presented dozens of workshops to help teachers understand how scientists think and how real science is conducted, including a 3credit course through UW Extension.

FREE Clock Hours and lunch provided by the Washington State Science and Engineering Fair.

To register, email gary.c.foss@boeing.com

Employment Notices
If you have a job opening and you would like to advertise it for free on WSTA.NET, please send the advertisement to webmaster and we will post it!  Please make sure the advertisement is in ASCII Text (no PDFs or other attachments).  Listings will be posted for 60 days.

Mentoring Students to Create High Quality Science Projects

FREE Clock Hours for Teachers!


9:30 to 3:30 Saturday March 28, 2015

Washington State Science and Engineering Fair

1500 13th Street, Bremerton, WA 9833

 

From making structured observations to communicating scientific results in a poster presentation, this 4hr course will cover the fundamentals of how scientists develop projects. We will walk participants through the development of a science research project by learning how to ask a testable research questioncollect and analyze quantitative data, and display the four parts of a scientific report. We’ll answer questions such as “Why do you need to replicate your project?” and “What’s the difference between the results and the discussion?” The course will help parents and teachers guide students in producing independent science research projects while meeting the Washington State education standards.

Components of the workshop will include:

·         Making observations and asking a testable research question.

 

·         Presentations and example posters describing research conducted at the University of Washington and through USDA Forest Service Research and Development.

 

·         Subtleties of designing research  methods: Controls, replication, sample size

 

·         What to  do with your data: Averages, graphs and statistics

 

·         Interpretation and Inference, drawing valid conclusions.

 

·         Mini-hands-on research project.

 

This won’t be a workshop on how science fair projects are judged but rather, a handson explanation of how high quality science projects are conceived, conducted, and communicated. After the workshop, participants should be able to guide students in critiquing scientific reports in the news, crafting testable research questions on any topic, and putting it all together in a clear and scientific poster.

 

Instructors: Kathryn Kelsey, Ph.D. Kathryn is a Science Teacher with the Seattle Public Schools and helps organize the Seattle Middle School Science and Engineering Fair. She has over two decades of science classroom experience.

Ashley Steel, Ph.D., is a quantitative ecologist and statistician with the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station. She  explores data from a wide variety of science topics and has been collecting and publishing her own data since the early 1990s.

Together, Kathryn and Ashley cowrote “The Truth About Science: A Curriculum for Developing Young Scientists” published in 2001 by NSTA Press and “Ecology by Inquiry” available online athttp://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/education/. They have designed and presented dozens of workshops to help teachers understand how scientists think and how real science is conducted, including a 3credit course through UW Extension.

FREE Clock Hours and lunch provided by the Washington State Science and Engineering Fair.

To register, email gary.c.foss@boeing.com

Employment Notices
If you have a job opening and you would like to advertise it for free on WSTA.NET, please send the advertisement to webmaster and we will post it!  Please make sure the advertisement is in ASCII Text (no PDFs or other attachments).  Listings will be posted for 60 days.

Mentoring Students to Create High Quality Science Projects

FREE Clock Hours for Teachers!


9:30 to 3:30 Saturday March 28, 2015

Washington State Science and Engineering Fair

1500 13th Street, Bremerton, WA 9833

 

From making structured observations to communicating scientific results in a poster presentation, this 4hr course will cover the fundamentals of how scientists develop projects. We will walk participants through the development of a science research project by learning how to ask a testable research questioncollect and analyze quantitative data, and display the four parts of a scientific report. We’ll answer questions such as “Why do you need to replicate your project?” and “What’s the difference between the results and the discussion?” The course will help parents and teachers guide students in producing independent science research projects while meeting the Washington State education standards.

Components of the workshop will include:

·         Making observations and asking a testable research question.

 

·         Presentations and example posters describing research conducted at the University of Washington and through USDA Forest Service Research and Development.

 

·         Subtleties of designing research  methods: Controls, replication, sample size

 

·         What to  do with your data: Averages, graphs and statistics

 

·         Interpretation and Inference, drawing valid conclusions.

 

·         Mini-hands-on research project.

 

This won’t be a workshop on how science fair projects are judged but rather, a handson explanation of how high quality science projects are conceived, conducted, and communicated. After the workshop, participants should be able to guide students in critiquing scientific reports in the news, crafting testable research questions on any topic, and putting it all together in a clear and scientific poster.

 

Instructors: Kathryn Kelsey, Ph.D. Kathryn is a Science Teacher with the Seattle Public Schools and helps organize the Seattle Middle School Science and Engineering Fair. She has over two decades of science classroom experience.

Ashley Steel, Ph.D., is a quantitative ecologist and statistician with the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station. She  explores data from a wide variety of science topics and has been collecting and publishing her own data since the early 1990s.

Together, Kathryn and Ashley cowrote “The Truth About Science: A Curriculum for Developing Young Scientists” published in 2001 by NSTA Press and “Ecology by Inquiry” available online athttp://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/education/. They have designed and presented dozens of workshops to help teachers understand how scientists think and how real science is conducted, including a 3credit course through UW Extension.

FREE Clock Hours and lunch provided by the Washington State Science and Engineering Fair.

To register, email gary.c.foss@boeing.com

Employment Notices
If you have a job opening and you would like to advertise it for free on WSTA.NET, please send the advertisement to webmaster and we will post it!  Please make sure the advertisement is in ASCII Text (no PDFs or other attachments).  Listings will be posted for 60 days.

Mentoring Students to Create High Quality Science Projects

FREE Clock Hours for Teachers!


9:30 to 3:30 Saturday March 28, 2015

Washington State Science and Engineering Fair

1500 13th Street, Bremerton, WA 9833

 

From making structured observations to communicating scientific results in a poster presentation, this 4hr course will cover the fundamentals of how scientists develop projects. We will walk participants through the development of a science research project by learning how to ask a testable research questioncollect and analyze quantitative data, and display the four parts of a scientific report. We’ll answer questions such as “Why do you need to replicate your project?” and “What’s the difference between the results and the discussion?” The course will help parents and teachers guide students in producing independent science research projects while meeting the Washington State education standards.

Components of the workshop will include:

·         Making observations and asking a testable research question.

 

·         Presentations and example posters describing research conducted at the University of Washington and through USDA Forest Service Research and Development.

 

·         Subtleties of designing research  methods: Controls, replication, sample size

 

·         What to  do with your data: Averages, graphs and statistics

 

·         Interpretation and Inference, drawing valid conclusions.

 

·         Mini-hands-on research project.

 

This won’t be a workshop on how science fair projects are judged but rather, a handson explanation of how high quality science projects are conceived, conducted, and communicated. After the workshop, participants should be able to guide students in critiquing scientific reports in the news, crafting testable research questions on any topic, and putting it all together in a clear and scientific poster.

 

Instructors: Kathryn Kelsey, Ph.D. Kathryn is a Science Teacher with the Seattle Public Schools and helps organize the Seattle Middle School Science and Engineering Fair. She has over two decades of science classroom experience.

Ashley Steel, Ph.D., is a quantitative ecologist and statistician with the USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station. She  explores data from a wide variety of science topics and has been collecting and publishing her own data since the early 1990s.

Together, Kathryn and Ashley cowrote “The Truth About Science: A Curriculum for Developing Young Scientists” published in 2001 by NSTA Press and “Ecology by Inquiry” available online athttp://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/education/. They have designed and presented dozens of workshops to help teachers understand how scientists think and how real science is conducted, including a 3credit course through UW Extension.

FREE Clock Hours and lunch provided by the Washington State Science and Engineering Fair.

To register, email gary.c.foss@boeing.com

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