Feb
21
5:00 PM17:00

Seattle: How climate change and pollution disproportionately impact communities of color

Reception at 5:00 PM, Program 5:30 to 7:00 PM

UW Health Science Building - Room T-435 - near the pedestrian overpass on
the 4th floor of the T Wing
Detailed directions may be found here

Please RSVP here.
 
Leaders from Front and Centered, researchers from the University of Washington Department of Health Sciences, and the UW Climate Impacts Group are collaborating on two critically important climate and environmental justice research projects that will
launch this year:
 
1. An environmental justice map of Washington State that overlays
population vulnerabilities, like health and income, with environmental
burdens, like toxics and air quality, to identify risk.

2. A report on equity and climate impacts. *Please join us on February
21, at 5:00 pm* for an in-depth discussion about this work, which will
be the first of a series hosted by Front and Centered.
 
In the months to come, we will also be hosting discussions about carbon
pricing, water quality, toxics, and voting.
 
We hope to see you on February 21st
all the best,
 
Aiko and the Front and Centered Coalition
 
And also Brad Brickman
 
Directions to Event
 

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Feb
23
5:30 PM17:30

Wenatchee: Chehalis-Douglas Land Trust: Wild Ideas

Location:

Pybus Event Center

RSVP here!

This year instead of the Spring Social, Chehalis-Douglas Land Trust is holding a new event - keeping much of what we loved about the Spring Social but making it more convenient and fun! The new event is called Wild Ideas.

Please join us for Wild Ideas, a fun, free event at Pybus Event Center featuring:

  • beer & wine available for $5 (cash only), non-alcoholic drinks and finger foods (free!),
  • three short, inspiring 5-minute talks about how we share our land with wildlife from local experts,
  • and an update on exciting new Land Trust projects!

Catch up with friends and meet new people interested in our land, water and trails. Beer from Wenatchee Valley Brewing and wine will be available for purchase for $5 (cash only), and light appetizers and snacks will be provided by the Land Trust, Pybus vendors, and Land Trust members.

After a beverage and some good conversation, we'll hear three short, fun, 5-minute talks on different aspects of sharing our land with wildlife, including: 

  • Identifying snakes - including how to keep both you and the snakes safe (Neal Hedges, CDLT Stewardship Director),
  • Helping some of the last remaining sage grouse in Washington survive and thrive by changing land practices (Lisa Dowling, Sage Grouse Initiative),
  • Designing trails to keep both wildlife and people happy (from David Visser, CDLT Board Member & Land Committee Member)

Then, you'll hear from Land Trust Executive Director Curt Soper about some exciting projects coming up in 2018! 

Whether you're a long-time Land Trust member or just want to hear more, come join us for Wild Ideas. Afterwards, grab dinner in Pybus Market and check out the Friday night music! 

RSVPs appreciated but not required. RSVP either online  or by calling (509) 667-9708.

Finger foods to share welcome! Sign up here , or contact Hillary for details at (509) 667-9708 or hillary@cdlandtrust.org .

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Feb
24
to Feb 25

Spokane Great Outdoors & Bike Expo

The Spokane Great Outdoors & Bike Expo is a two-day celebration of all the awesome outdoor recreation and travel opportunities and the amazing lifestyle we enjoy here in the Inland Pacific Northwest. In partnership with the Spokane Golf Show – the two shows will be connected, allowing ticket holders to freely move through both shows – this second-year event will feature over 60 biking, outdoor gear, adventure travel, and tourism exhibitors; presentations, clinics, and activities; gear giveaways; and up to 6,000 attendees. Join us at the Spokane Convention Center, Saturday and Sunday February 24-25, 2018.

For more information: http://www.spokaneoutdoorexpo.com/

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Feb
26
3:30 PM15:30

UW Seattle- Communicate Science with different audiences

Location:  UW Seattle

We have limited space, so RSVP here to confirm your spot

Hoping to improve your ability to communicate science with different audiences? Want to discuss how connecting with your audience changes in different contexts?

Join us for an interactive workshop addressing best outreach practices with broad and diverse audiences. Isabel Carrera Zamanillo will lead us in discussions and activities focusing on how to make our science outreach approachable for any audience. This event is cohosted by the department outreach groups in ESS, ATMS, and SAFS.

 

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Feb
26
6:00 PM18:00

Seattle: Artist Talk by Rachel Lodge: “Imagining the Carbon Cycle: Art + Science”

Elisabeth C. Miller Library, UW Center for Urban Horticulture

3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle, WA

Artist Rachel Lodge will talk about the thinking and process behind the “Carbon Storylines” exhibit. “I’ll speak about how I came to the carbon cycle as a subject and my working process for making the animations, digital prints, and carbon-based objects display in the exhibit, as well as some of the issues involved in translating the science in an engaging way. If you haven’t already seen the exhibit, it may be of special interest to you as a conservationist, science or environmental educator (for adults or children), or as an advocate for green solutions to climate change.  The Library is open continuously on the day of the talk from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m., so if you are planning to come for the 6:00 p.m. talk there will be time to see the exhibit before or afterwards. The exhibit closes on February 28.”

In conjunction with CARBON STORYLINES exhibit, February 1-28, 2018

For more information

More images and animation here:  racheldlodge.com

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Feb
27
1:30 PM13:30

NAAEE Webinar: Learning Gardens and Learning Landscapes

Learning Gardens and Learning Landscapes: Connecting Young People to Nature
February 27 at 1:30 PM Pacific Time

NAAEE hope to see you on for NAAEE's monthly webinar series. We'll be joined by Dilafruz WIlliams (Portland State University), Nilda Cosco (Natural Learning Initiative at NC State University), and Robin Moore (Natural Learning Initiative at NC State University), who will be discussing learning landscapes and how we can design opportunities to connect more young people (and educators!) to nature.

Learn more and register here: NAAEE Webinar

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Mar
2
8:00 AM08:00

WA State Civic Leadership Conference- Wenatchee

Location: Wenatchee Valley College, 1300 Fifth St., Wenatchee, WA 98801
Cost: $35-$45
By the Washington State TRIO Association

The WA State Civic Leadership Conference educates students to become self-aware of how they can have an impact within their community. Through a variety of workshops and keynote speakers, the conference will focus on four objectives: Developing professional skills for civic leadership, Sharing your stories/paths towards civic leadership, Real time advocacy with civic leadership, and Networking with other student leaders. The Civic Leadership Conference will strengthen students’ leadership styles, and they will learn how to become informed on how they can be advocates for important issues that TRIO students face.

The Federal TRIO Programs (TRIO) are Federal outreach and student services programs designed to identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds.

To Sign up, go to: Everbrite

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Mar
7
6:30 PM18:30

Pasco: Vernal Pools by Columbia Basin Chapter WA Native Plant Society

Monthly Meeting: Vernal Pools

Location: Columbia Basin College SWL BLDG RM 117. Pasco WA.

At 6:30 PM, we have an informal plant identification and get together. Bring a mystery plant (non-ornamental) if you like and we will attempt to identify it for you. 

At 7PM, Judy Pottmeyer will tell us about vernal pools on the Hanford Site. More information to come.

For more information, go to: Columbia Basin WA Native Plant Society

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Mar
10
9:00 AM09:00

NGSS in Action: Understanding Urban Water Systems

This IslandWood-King County program is appropriate for 4-12th grade teachers. 
Clock hours available pending approval from the Puget Sound ESD.

South Treatment Plant
1200 Monster Road S.W.
Renton, WA 98057

Would you like to learn more about how urban water systems work? Are you curious how water systems and related conservation issues can interest your students and integrate with NGSS? Join IslandWood and King County staff on a tour of a treatment plant and stormwater garden in Renton to learn about wastewater and stormwater systems, and then workshop how you might use this content in your classroom.

For more information, go to: NGSS in Action

 

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Mar
12
7:00 PM19:00

Olympia Native Plant Society: Pollinators and Invasive Plants

Restoring Pollinators to South Sound Prairies and The Effect of Invasive Plants
By Dr. Susan Waters
Location: Washington State Capitol Museum Coach House
211 21st Avenue SW, Olympia, WA 98501

Dr. Susan Waters, is a Rare Species Biologist with the Center for Natural Lands Management (CNLM) working to restore butterflies and pollinators to the South Sound Prairies. Waters’ interests in ecology and restoration are centered on the importance of species interactions – the interactions between organisms, which affect the structure of ecological communities.

Her research looks at the relationship of pollinators, invasive plants and native plants. In her research, Susan has explored how two important agents of change, invasion of exotic plants and climate change, are influencing our South Sound Prairies. First, she investigated how exotic plant species influence the way pollinators respond to native plants. She found that having high densities of exotic flowers surrounding a native plant can increase or decrease how often pollinators visit native flowers (depending on the native plant species and conditions of the site) affecting how much seed a native plant can produce. Second, she explored how exotic plants blooming earlier, due to climate change, altered the interactions between pollinators and native plants (which are not expected to shift their blooming dates earlier to the same degree as exotic species).

She found that when exotic plants bloom earlier, the amount of seed produced by native plants increases or decreases dramatically depending on the native plant species.

Susan Waters also founded the Urban Pollination Project, a citizen science project to look at pollinators and food production. She will share her work with us.

For more information go to: Washington Native Plant Society

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Mar
14
7:00 PM19:00

Worms? Our Favorite Soil Engineers have a Dark Side

Seattle Naturalists Study Group lecture.

Where: Seattle Program Center, 7700 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115

Everyone knows earthworms and red wigglers are beneficial, right? In fact, worms have a dark side that appears when they’re introduced to places where they are not native. Earthworms are ecosystem engineers that have fundamental effects on the soil environment — including temperature, moisture, nutrient content, structure, and soilfoodweb biota. This can have cascading effects on natural ecosystem functions and processes.  Are there native worms?  Are there effective pesticides or treatment protocols for invasive worms?  Is anyone working on this problem in the Northwest? 

Clay Antieau is a horticulturist, botanist and environmental scientist with Seattle Public Utilities, and lectures and leads tours throughout the Northwest. He is past president of the Washington Native Plant Society.

 No registration required - just $5 at the door. Attendance is free for members of the Naturalist Study Group. 

For more information, go to Mountaineers Events

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Mar
19
8:30 AM08:30

Mukilteo: Informal and Community-Based Science Educators’ Meeting

Future of Flight Aviation Center, Mukilteo

Register Today

This ’17-’18 school year, the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and the Educational Service Districts (ESDs) will co-host meetings across the state for community-based and informal science educators.  These meetings build on previous meetings and will be a continued opportunity to explore how informal and community-based science education providers can best support classroom science learning and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).  This year includes a special focus on integrated STEM learning, especially engineering.

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Apr
9
9:00 AM09:00

Vancouver: Informal and Community-Based Science Educators’ Meeting

Location: ESD 112, Vancouver
Register Now

This ’17-’18 school year, the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and the Educational Service Districts (ESDs) will co-host meetings across the state for community-based and informal science educators. These meetings build on previous meetings and will be a continued opportunity to explore how informal and community-based science education providers can best support classroom science learning and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). 

This year includes a special focus on integrated STEM learning, especially engineering.

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Apr
20
7:00 PM19:00

Survivability of an Earthquake in Lake Missoula Flood Sediments

Location: Tualatin Heritage Center, 8700 SW Sweek Drive, Tualatin, Oregon

Speaker:  William D. Burgel, BS Engineering University of Michigan 1971, MS Geology Idaho State University 1986
Bill Burgel will discuss the geology of the Northwest and how various depositions will respond during an earthquake.  Are you in a safe place?  Come learn about the ground beneath you.  

For more information: http://iafi.org/calendar/

Contact Sylvia Thompson – 503-257-0144 for more information. 

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Apr
21
11:00 AM11:00

Naturevision- Earth Day Family Nature Walk!

Location: Tolt River-John MacDonald Park, 31020 Northeast 40th Street, Carnation, WA 98014

Join Nature Vision at Tolt-MacDonald Park to explore the casual hiking trails of this beautiful park! This hour long nature walk, led by a Nature Vision Educator, will involve frequent stops to learn about diverse plant communities and time to discover some of the animals that depend on green spaces at the park. Use this experience in nature to become inspired about Earth Day and deepen your connection to our shared environment.

Event is limited to 30 participants.

FAQs

What are my transportation/parking options for getting to and from the event?

Park entrance is at NE 40th St and Highway 203 at the south end of Carnation. Day-use parking is available on-site. Please park in the lot to the right as you enter the park (you will see the big red barn off to the right and the parking lot is before this) or in the lot to your left a little farther into the park. No motorized vehicle access on west side of river other than service vehicles.

Please meet the Nature Vision educator at the base of the suspension bridge on the NE side of the Snoqualmie River; this is before you cross over the walking suspension bridge.

What should I bring to the event?

Please wear comfortable walking shoes or rain boots and weather appropriate gear. We will be having our event no matter the weather! You might want to bring some binoculars to see many of the beautiful birds living in this park.

Sign up for Free program: Eventbrite

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Apr
27
to Apr 29

Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival

Grays Harbor Shorebird and Nature Festival

Celebrating the natural world and the spring shorebird migration

Each spring, hundreds of thousands of shorebirds stop to rest and feed along the Washington Coast and in the Grays Harbor estuary during their migration northward. Coming from as far south as Argentina, these Arctic-bound shorebirds are among the world's greatest migrants. Some birds travel over 15,000 miles round trip! The concentration of birds during spring migration offers people a great chance to view a number of shorebird species. With luck you will also see the birds fly together in beautiful formations while trying to escape a Peregrine Falcon.

Shorebird is the name given to the group of birds that are usually found along the shoreline. They include plovers, turnstones, sandpipers, dowitchers, and others. Some shorebirds can be found in Grays Harbor County all year; others only during their migration. A good way to start learning the common shorebirds is to attend the Festival's shorebird identification class and field trip.

The shorebird spectacle happens every year at Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge and in other parts of the County. People from around the world come to view this event of hemispheric importance. The Festival works to bring people together for this incredible natural phenomenon.

For more information, go to Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival

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Apr
29
10:00 AM10:00

Ellensburg Wildflower and Wind Power Walk

Explore the vast array of shrub steppe wildflowers at the Wild Horse Wind Facility. Enjoy the guided wildflower walks, presentations, displays, and wind turbine tours. Wildflower walks will also be offered mid-week by appointment from mid-April through May.

RSVP Required: wildhorse@pse.com

10am Wind Turbine Tour
11am Wildflower Orientation
11:30 Wildflower Walk
2pm Wind Turbine Tour
3pm Wildflower Orientation
3:30 Wildflower Walk

For more information, go to: My Ellensburg

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May
14
7:00 PM19:00

Olympia: Moss As An Indicator of Air Pollution

Location: Washington State Capitol Museum Coach House
211 21st Avenue SW, Olympia, WA 98501
Sarah Jovan

Sarah Jovan, PhD, is a Research Ecologist and Lichen Indicator Advisor for U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR. Absorbent and rootless, moss and lichen are regularly employed as indicators of air pollution in European cities, but environmental scientists in the United States are just starting to take advantage of this indicator. Jovan will share some of her work with us.

For more information, go to Washington Native Plant Society

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May
18
8:00 AM08:00

Endangered Species Day

Teachers & Students Encouraged to Participate in Endangered Species Day (May 18, 2018)

 The 13th annual international Endangered Species Day on May 18, 2018 offers biology, ecology and other teachers an ideal opportunity to educate students about the importance of protecting threatened and endangered plant and animal species. In addition to classroom discussions, there are several ways students can participate in Endangered Species Day (first approved by the U.S. Senate in 2006), such as:  

*Plan a school-wide Endangered Species Day fair with exhibits.
*Arrange a special display in the school library or cafeteria.
*Invite a local expert to speak to the school/class.
*Work with a community/environmental group on a habitat restoration project.
*Attend an event at a local zoo, aquarium, botanic garden or other location.

Depending on your school schedule, you can plan events earlier in May or on Endangered Species Day (5/18) itself. Once a specific activity is planned, the class can register it on the Endangered Species Day website) or send the information (and your questions) to David Robinson, Endangered Species Day Director: drobinson@endangered.org (link sends e-mail)

Be sure to check out the resource materials in the Endangered Species Day Toolkit on the website, including event planning tips, stickers, bookmarks, fliers, banner, passport, coloring/activity sheets (many of which can be downloaded and printed) and more. The website also features a Teacher Resource Center/Teacher Forum.

For more information, visit:

Endangered Species Day website

 

 

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May
18
7:00 PM19:00

New Understandings of Mt. St. Helens

Location: Tualatin Heritage Center, 8700 SW Sweek Drive, Tualatin, Oregon

Speaker:  Sheila Alfsen, MAT, GIT (Oregon State Board Geologic Examiners)
Current instructor of Geology –  Chemeketa Community College, Linn Benton, Portland State University.

The 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Washington was the worst US volcanic disaster in recorded history.  Geologist Sheila Alfsen, will break down the event into its components, illustrating all volcanic hazards as geologic occurrences with examples from other volcanoes and comparing their relative sizes. Sheila will discuss the advances in volcanology made as result of the eruption, and how they are used around the world to gain prediction and offer disaster mitigation.

For more information, go to: Ice Age Flood Institute

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May
19
to May 21

Washington Native Plant Society study weekend in Spokane

The Eastern Washington University campus will serve as our "home base" for a variety of activities,  including a reception and speaker on Friday evening, and banquet and keynote speakers on Saturday evening. 

We're planning a full weekend with a variety of plant-centric activities to choose from, including field trips highlighting

  • the geologic history of our region, 
  • the diverse flora of our local shrub-steppe, palouse prairie, lowland ponderosa woodland, and subalpine forest ecosystems, 
  • propagation of native plants  
  • exploration of the Clarkia fossil beds in Northern Idaho.
  • botanical illustration and photography

For more information, go to Washington Native Plant Society

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Jun
8
8:00 AM08:00

World Oceans Day: Keep Oceans Blue

World Oceans Day is a global day of ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future. This site serves as a central coordinating platform for World Oceans Day, with free resources and ideas for everyone – no matter where you live – to help expand the reach and impact of World Oceans Day on June 8 and year-round.

Conservation action focus for World Oceans Day 2018: 

Encouraging solutions to plastic pollution and preventing marine litter for a healthier ocean and a better future

To learn more, visit: Worlds Ocean Day

Or watch their short video here: Celebrate Worlds Ocean Day.

 

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Feb
14
7:00 PM19:00

Transplanting that Makes Cents:

 

Location: Tacoma Nature Center

Rita Hummel, PhD, Horticulturalist, emeritus Washington State University, brings a broad variety of interests to us. These include developing recycled organic materials as substrates and nutrient sources for nursery and greenhouse container production and landscape use; enhancing water conservation in container production and landscapes; improve longevity of trees and shrubs in the landscape by preventing root structural defects; developing production practices for difficult to grow native plants; and determining woody plant adaptation to rain gardens under Pacific Northwest environmental conditions.

As a part of her work, Dr. Hummel has done extensive research on plant varieties for use in landscapes, and the most effective methods for transplanting for success and healthy growth. She will share some of those insights with us.

For more information, go to the Washington Native Plant Society

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Feb
12
7:00 PM19:00

Mapping the Historic Prairies of the Olympic Peninsula- in Olympia

Location: Historic Lord Mansion and Coach House, Olympia WA

Washington Native Plant Society South Sound Chapter Meeting in Olympia

Dr. David Peter, US Forest Service, will give a talk on "Mapping the Historic Prairies of the Olympic Peninsula," most are just remnants of their historic boundaries. Learn about where they were located and what plants they contained.

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Feb
12
7:00 PM19:00

Ignite Education Lab: Seattle Times and Town Hall

Location: Seattle University’s Campion Hall
Purchase $5 tickets here: Eventbrite

What do you get when you combine a handful of stellar teachers, a former “mean girl,” and a seventh-grader who has never missed a day of school? Some great stories, and the speaker lineup for Ignite Education Lab, our annual storytelling event.

Over the next month, each of our 10 speakers will create a speedy talk (no more than five minutes) timed to slides that advance every 15 seconds. They were chosen from about three dozen people who submitted ideas — we looked for people who could tell interesting, insightful, personal stories that surprised, delighted and moved us.

We also have two great emcees lined up for the event. They are: Nate Bowling, the 2016 Washington State Teacher of the Year and teacher at Tacoma’s Lincoln High, and Teresa Scribner, an award-winning media studies teacher at Cleveland High who brought down the house at Ignite Education Lab last year with her talk “Black Hair Matters.”

For more information, go to: Ignite Education Lab

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Feb
11
3:00 PM15:00

Port Townsend Lecture: Phytoplankton in a Changing Ocean Climate

Where: Fort Worden Chapel
Admission: $5  (students, teachers FREE) 

Virginia Armbrust, PhD
Director of School of
Oceanography at the
University of Washington

E. Virginia Armbrust’s research focuses on marine phytoplankton, particularly marine diatoms, which are responsible for about 20% of global photosynthesis. She has pioneered the use of environmental genomics and transcriptomics, combined with metabolomics, to understand how natural diatom communities are shaped by the environment and by their interactions with other microbes. Most recently, she has identified chemical signals that form the basis of cross-kingdom communication. Her group developed ship-board instrumentation that now permits the fine-scale continuous mapping of distributions, growth rates and loss rates of different groups of phytoplankton.

For more information, go to Port Townsend Marine Science Center

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Feb
10
8:00 AM08:00

Bird Focus: Corvids

Location: Seward Park Audubon Center
5902 Lake Washington Blvd S, Seattle, 98118

Bird Focus: Corvids
Crows, Ravens and More!
Saturday, February 10 8:00-10:00 am
$5 Ages 10 and up

 
Our earliest human ancestors shared their lives with crows, ravens, jays and magpies otherwise known as Corvids. These birds have intrigued people around the world for thousands of years. From the Scandinavians to the Haida and even famous poets like Edgar Allen Poe, Corvids have inspired people with their intelligence and beauty. Come along on a walk through Seward Park with naturalist Ed Dominguez as he talks about some of the world's most intelligent and interesting birds: Corvids!

For more information, go to: Seward Park Audubon

Ed Dominguez
Lead Naturalist
edominguez@audubon.org
206 652 2444 ext 107

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Feb
6
to Feb 8

Washington & Oregon Higher Education Sustainability Conference

Location: Portland State University, Smith Memorial Student Union

The Washington & Oregon Higher Education Sustainability Conference (WOHESC) is a platform for empowering and inspiring change making, facilitating action, and for sharing, networking, and collaboration related to sustainability within the region’s higher education institutions. Through facilitated conversation, workshops, presentations and networking opportunities, participants will play a role in advancing environmental performance at Washington and Oregon State institutions of higher education, support regional policy goals and initiatives, and drive the development of a generation of professionals for whom sustainability is a core tenant of their work and life philosophy.

Conference Highlights

  • Four Tracks of programming
  • Opportunity to network with 400+ regional leaders in the industry
  • Keynote Addresses

For more information, go to WOHESC

 

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Feb
1
8:00 AM08:00

K-12 Food Waste Reduction Webinar

Attend the K-12 Food Waste Reduction Webinar to learn how you may be able to save your school district money & green your school. Learn how to implement these efforts in ways that minimize the staff time & maximize results & community buy-in.

This webinar is designed specifically for K-12 school administrators, however all school district staff are welcome to attend.

Click this link at 9 am on February 1st to view the webinar slides.

http://epawebconferencing.acms.com/k12foodwaste4administrators/

Call in information to hear the presenters:

Call In Number: 1-202-991-0477 Participant Code ID: 9849929

Instructions:

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before:

Test your connection:http://epawebconferencing.acms.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Get a quick overview:http://www.adobe.com/products/adobeconnect.html

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Jan
31
4:15 PM16:15

Sound Science and Sound Journalism in an Era of Fake News

Hosted by: Island Press in partnership with the Security and Sustainability Forum
Webinar requires you to Register Here

Features veteran journalist Carey Gillam, who is Research Director for the non-profit U.S. Right to Know and author of Whitewash: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science.

Carey will be joined by Dr. Dana Barr, Environmental Health Professor at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health for a conversation on the impacts of glyphosate on our food and health and how this research serves as a case study for the importance of scientific and journalistic rigor. The discussion will be moderated by journalist Paul Thacker and will be followed by an audience question and answer session.

In this webinar, our panelists will look at the hurdles facing pesticide research as a case study for how journalists and scientists conduct their work in an era of fake news and corporate influence. The panelists’ investigations into the negative impact of glyphosate and other pesticides will illustrate the importance of seeking source documents and independent studies.

Sound Science and Sound Journalism is a major issue of our time.

For more information, go to:
Sound Science and Sound Journalism in an Era of Fake News

 

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Jan
28
7:00 PM19:00

Evening beach walks with Seattle Aquarium Beach Naturalists

Location: Constellation Park/South Alki Beach in West Seattle

Explore the beach during winter nighttime low tides with beach naturalist staff and volunteers. Discover what creatures we see on the beach at this time of year. Dress for the weather (bundle up!) and for tide pooling: boots, hats, gloves and a good flashlight are musts.

For more information, go to: http://www.seattleaquarium.org/upcoming-events

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Jan
27
9:00 AM09:00

Ocean Career Day: Seattle Aquarium

Location: Seattle Aquarium

Ocean Career Day is an opportunity for middle, high school and college students to learn about educational, volunteer, internship and career opportunities at a variety of colleges, nonprofits and government institutions. Parents, guardians and teachers are also welcome to attend.

Join us for formal presentations from marine science professionals and a panel presentation from representatives of colleges and universities—plus, speak with representatives from a variety of ocean-related organizations.

For more information, go to: Seattle Aquarium

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Jan
23
6:30 PM18:30

The Profanity Peak Pack: Spokane Lands Council

721 N Cincinnati Street
Spokane WA

The Lands Council, along with the Center for Justice, KYRS Community Radio, and Gonzaga Environmental Law, present – The Profanity Peak Pack: Set Up & Sold Out. The screening will be held at Gonzaga University Law School, Moot Courtroom.

The movie provides a detailed account what went wrong during the summer of 2016 that led to the decimation one of Washington’s recovering wolf packs. Screening will be followed by a question and answer session featuring the films producer, Brooks Fahy; Washington University Professor and former Director of the Large Carnivore Conservation Laboratory, Dr. Robert Wielgus; and Tim Coleman, featured in the film, from Kettle Range Conservation Group.

For more information, go to: https://landscouncil.org/event

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Jan
23
6:00 PM18:00

Colors of the West- An Evening with Molly Hashimoto and Saul Weisberg

Location: The Royal Room
5000 Rainier Ave S, Seattle, 98118

The Seward Park Audubon Center is excited to welcome award winning artist Molly Hashimoto and the Executive Director of the North Cascades Institute, Saul Weisberg to The Royal Room. Molly and Saul will discuss their mutual love for the outdoors and the inspiration they draw from it. The evening will include poetry readings from Saul's book, Headwaters, as well as discussion and readings by Molly from her new book, Colors of the West, which explores wild landscapes of the western United States through the lens of watercolor.

For more information go to: http://sewardpark.audubon.org

Marina Pita
206-652-2444 x 107
mpita@audubon.org

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Jan
18
12:00 PM12:00

Sustainable Seattle: Energy Democracy

Sustainable Cities Roundtable

Location: Seattle Central Library, 1000 4th Ave, Seattle, WA 98104

Join us at Seattle Central Library for a discussion with Island Press author and President and CEO of Emerald Cities Collaborative Denise Fairchild about her new book, Energy Democracy: Advancing Equity in Clean Energy Solutions.

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Jan
14
3:00 PM15:00

Port Townsend Lecture: Sea-Level Rise’s Impact on Humans and H...

Where: Fort Worden Chapel
Admission: $5  (students, teachers FREE) 

Eric E. Grossman
Research Geologist, U.S. Geological Survey
Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Urban growth, rising seas and changes in Pacific Northwest stream runoff are placing unprecedented pressure on coastal ecosystems and communities across Puget Sound. Estuaries, beaches and floodplains support many important uses, including fish and wildlife habitat, nationally-important farmland, and natural flood protection to prime real estate, industry and transportation corridors. Intensifying competition for coastal lands raises both the urgency and the challenge of adaptively managing ecosystems and the services they provide for long-term human well-being while accommodating near-term farming, growth and other land-uses. This presentation will synthesize climate change impact pathways leading to coastal squeeze of the Salish Sea and new research aimed to help resource managers and communities plan for adaptation.

For more information, go to the Port Townsend Marine Science Center

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Jan
12
7:00 PM19:00

Jumping Into Fire: The WWII Story of Black Airborne Infantry Smokejumpers

Jumping Into Fire: The WWII Story of Black Airborne Infantry Smokejumpers in the Pacific Northwest and the Secret War They Fought

Location:  South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St.
Spokane, WA 99203

In the summer of 1945, 300 Black Army Airborne troops cross-trained in Pendleton, Oregon to fight fires in the Pacific Northwest. These men also fought a secret war threat - code name "Operation Firefly." Their mission began in secret and ended the same. This is their story.

For more information, go to: Spokane Library Events

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Dec
11
4:30 PM16:30

Not Just Talking Trash: Marine Debris and What We Can Do About It!

Register for the NOAA planet stewards December Webinar! Join us Monday December 11, 2017 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Space is Limited! Reserve Your Seat at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5857129614069346051

NOAA Planet Stewards is pleased to welcome Krista Stegemann, the Communications and Education Specialist for NOAA's Marine Debris Program as our featured speaker

Marine debris - trash in the ocean or Great Lakes, is one of the greatest pollution problems facing our waters today. Debris harms wildlife and their habitats, is a hazard to navigation, and impacts the economy and human health. This global issue comes from one source: people. Thankfully, that means that people have the power to solve this problem! Marine debris can be a difficult to talk about without starting to feel overwhelmed and hopeless. The secret to empowering people to become marine debris stewards is focusing on the hopeful side of the issue.

Learn more about the science of marine debris, how to talk about and connect to the problem of this issue, what resources are out there to help you, what we’re still learning about it, and how to get involved in the solution. Everyone can be part of addressing this problem, figuring out where to start is the first step.

Find out more at: NOAA Ocean Services

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Dec
10
3:00 PM15:00

Port Townsend Lecture: Short of breath: marine life in a warming...

Where: Commons at Fort Worden, Port Townsend WA

Admission: $5  (students, teachers FREE) 

Curtis Deutsch, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Oceanography, College of the Environment
University of Washington

Dr. Curtis Deutsch’s research is aimed at understanding the interactions between climate and ecosystems. He combines numerical models of varying complexity with diverse types of biological and physical data, to discover the ways in which climate produces spatial pattern and temporal variability in ecosystems, and thus influences their basic functioning. 

For more information, go to Port Townsend Marine Science Center


 

  

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Dec
9
9:00 AM09:00

Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Group Work Party

Location: Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association 3057 East Bakerview Road Bellingham, WA
Cost: Free
Contact: Raena Anderson randerson@n-sea.org (360) 715-0283 ext. 112

Bring sturdy shoes, weather-appropriate clothing, friends and family. We’ll bring the tools; gloves; coffee courtesy of Tony's Coffee; and snacks courtesy of The Bagelry, Starbucks Coffee, and the Community Food Co-op!

Help NSEA do what it does best – restore salmon habitat with the help of community volunteers! This week we’ll work with private land owners by restoring the riparian zone along Squalicum Creek. Our goals for the day include planting native trees and shrubs. Park at our new and improved site at 3057 E. Bakerview Rd and look for the blue NSEA tent.

For more information, go to:  www.n-sea.org/work-parties

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Dec
7
12:00 PM12:00

Sustainable Seattle: Urban Resilience

Sustainable Cities Roundtable

Location: Community Hall at the Wing Luke Museum. 719 S King Street, Seattle, WA 98104

Lunch & Learn: As a lunchtime event, you are welcome to bring lunch to enjoy during the Roundtable.

Join us for a discussion of strategies for strengthening resilience in both urban and rural communities, how these approaches differ, and how they complement each other to make our region stronger.

Directions:

By Bike: Find your most convenient route here.

By Bus: Routes 7, 14, 36, and 99 Waterfront Streetcar Line, and y bus that stops t the Chinatown-International District Bus Tunnel Station, as well as Link Light Rail. See Metro's Trip Planner to map out your transit options.

By Car:

-Coming from North of I-5: Take exit 165A toward James St. Once you get off the highway, merge right onto 6th Ave. and follow the road. You will enter the heart of the district after passing Jackson Street.

-Coming from South of I-5: Take exit 164A toward James ST./ Madison St. / Dearborn St. Follow signs for Dearborn St. and then turn left at S. Dearborn St. Turn right at 6th Avenue S. and you will enter the heart of the district.

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Nov
14
10:00 AM10:00

eeWORKS: Demonstrating the Power of Environmental Education

Please join us for the November installment of NAAEE's monthly webinar series (Bringing New Ideas and Innovation to the field of EE). On Tuesday, November 14 from 1:00-2:00 pm EST, we will be joined by NAAEE's very own Executive Director, Judy Braus, as well as two esteemed environmental education researchers: Dr. Nicole Ardoin (Stanford University) and Alison Bowers (Virginia Tech & Stanford University). This dynamite team will be discussing our eeWORKS project, which is a research-to-practice initiative designed to demonstrate the impact of environmental education for achieving key outcomes. We will discuss our progress to date and how you can use the results to promote your work and the field of EE as a whole.

To date, we have completed research reviews and are designing communications around the impact of EE on: K-12 student achievement, conservation, and climate change education. Other reviews in the works include: nature connection in early childhood, civic engagement, positive youth development, and citizen science.

You can learn more about eeWORKS and completed work to date here: https://naaee.org/our-work/programs/eeworks We hope you'll join us to learn more!

Register for the webinar now and we will send you the recording if you are not able to make it! 

 

For more information, go to: NAAEE EEPro

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Nov
14
to Nov 18

2017 National Association of Interpretation Conference, Spokane

About the Conference

Immersed in rich cultural history and surrounding natural beauty, Spokane has long been a place where people gather to exchange goods and ideas. As Washington state’s second-largest destination (next to Seattle), the Spokane Valley is a hub for commerce, the environment and tourism. In its past and present, it is the largest trading hub for gathering tribes and businesses that include three states (Washington, Idaho, and Montana) and two Canadian provinces (British Columbia and Alberta).
 
With a vibrant waterfall and river running through this urban metropolis, one can easily forget that they’re in the midst of a big city.  Spokane offers the best of nature and heritage, proving to be an ideal location for this year’s national conference.
 
The word “Spokane” comes from the local native community, meaning “Children of the Sun.”  Join us in illuminating interpretation to our communities, ourselves, and future generations to come.
 

Book your lodging today!

Reserve a room at the Davenport Grand Hotel by October 20, 2017, and receive a $50 discount on registration!

Key Note Speaker

History, Honor, Healing, Hope

Clarence Moriwaki
President, Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community
Friday, 8:30am

Clarence Moriwakiwill speak on the impact of fear, war hysteria, prejudice, and the failure of political leadership during the Japanese American exclusion during World War II. He is the founder and past president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial in Washington State. It is the site of the very first Japanese Americans who were taken from their communities and put into concentration camps during World War II in the United States.

For more information: National Association of Interpretation

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Nov
12
3:00 PM15:00

Port Townsend Lecture: Sharing the Sound― Salmon, Steelhead and...

Where: Fort Worden Chapel, Port Townsend WA
Admission: $5 (students, teachers FREE) 

By Jill Rolland, Sc.D.

For decades, scientists and concerned citizens have called for improving salmon spawning and rearing habitats in an attempt to reverse the trend of dwindling runs of salmon and steelhead in Puget Sound. To date, restoration has been critical in improving salmon smolt and juvenile steelhead survival. Unfortunately, these improvements have not been enough to produce the recovery that might have been expected. Increasingly, scientists are learning that other anthropogenic changes to the Puget Sound ecosystem, ranging from sky glow to ubiquitous pathogens, are likely having a greater impact on salmon and steelhead recovery than previously realized.

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Nov
9
1:00 PM13:00

Webinar: A Sampling of Federal Education Resources Supporting Earth and Space Science Instruction

 

Registration Deadline: November 7, 2017

Webinar Description

This webinar will review a sampling of federal STEM education resources, with emphasis on Earth and space science. These resources, which are largely based on real-world data, are for many teachers vital to their approach to implementing the Next Generation Science Standards in Earth and space science. The importance of these resources inspires many educators to engage in conversations about local, state, and federal policies and budgets. As part of this webinar, a representative of the Geoscience Policy Department at the American Geoscience Institute (AGI) will outline effective approaches to contacting decision makers, especially at the federal level.

Webinar Organizers:

Aida Awad (Broward College, Fort Lauderdale, FL)
Edward Robeck (American Geosciences Institute)
Carla McAuliffe (NESTA)
John McDaris (National Association of Geoscience Teachers)

With the NGSS Earth and Space Science Working Group

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Nov
8
12:00 PM12:00

Sustainable Seattle: Community-driven Climate Resilience

Sustainable Cities Roundtable

Join us at the Mountaineers Club for a special two-hour Roundtable with Island Press author Rebecca Wodder and New Orleans' Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development's Arthur Johnson for a conversation about how to build community resilience to climate-driven water challenges- and build natural and social capital in the process.

This RoundTable is co-presented by Green Infrastructure Partnership, a group of non-profits, government agencies, organizations and businesses dedicated to providing green solutions to stormwater pollution.

Click here to learn more about GRIP.

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Nov
8
12:00 PM12:00

King Country- Community Leadership, Climate Resilience, and Green Infrastructure

*Free pre-registration required on Eventbrite
The Mountaineers – 7700 Sand Point Way Northeast, Seattle, WA 98115

From impacts to drinking water supplies to changes in weather patterns, many of the ways people will see and experience the impacts of a changing climate in their daily lives are connected to the water cycle. And because climate-driven impacts on rainfall and water quality can be felt in dramatically different ways depending on the region, tailored, bottom-up solutions that rely on local knowledge and culture will be most effective. Bringing people together with a sense of purpose to protect and improve the places they love is a cornerstone of climate resilience, and is especially important in communities that are vulnerable to extreme climate events. Empowering communities to find sustainable solutions that work with nature, rather than against it, will improve natural and social capital.

Please join Island Press author Rebecca Wodder, and the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development’s Executive Director Arthur Johnson for a conversation about how to build community resilience to climate-driven water challenges – and build natural and social capital in the process. Ms. Wodder brings a policy context and will discuss strategies for community engagement, while Mr. Johnson will provide case studies in building community resilience using examples from his work with residents to rebuild after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward.

Speakers:

- Rebecca Wodder, Island Press author and renowned conservation leader  

-Arthur Johnson, Executive Director of Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development

Don't forget to Register

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