Apr
29
9:00 am09:00

Garden Educator Workshop Spring Seminar 2: Seattle

Hosted by Tilth Alliance @ Good Shepherd Center, Room 107
Save $20 by registering for all three Spring Seminars! The dates are March 25, April 29 and May 20. To receive the discounted rate, purchase an individual ticket of $250 ($225 for members) on the first day and you will be automatically registered for all three seminars.


Immerse yourself in outdoor teaching techniques and schoolyard gardening! Learn how to grow an effective and robust schoolyard garden program.

Garden Educator Workshop: Spring Seminar 2: Grow

Seminar 2 delves into the core issues of creating a sustainable learning garden and connecting the garden to the classroom. Teachers, parents and volunteers will investigate the supporting infrastructure of a sustainable garden program, develop a year round garden and school calendar, garden program leadership, seasonal activities and lesson planning.   

Seminar participants will:
·         learn ways to connect the garden to the classroom
·         examine programming components such as volunteer management, fundraising, garden maintenance, community engagement, events and summertime garden care
·         explore the role for a successful garden coordinator(s) 
·         find synergies between the school year and growing calendar
·         learn how to develop a garden lesson on your own

While we’re outdoors, we’ll check on the seeds and transplants that were planted during Seminar 1. We will build a trellis, plant new spring crops, explore season extension techniques and other seasonal garden tasks that you can apply at your school garden. Gain experience creating and learning about practical lessons in a supportive and engaging environment that will inspire and empower you to share with your students. 

Hands-on, outdoor garden education is part of every seminar. Come dressed for the weather and prepared to have fun and get a little dirty!

We highly encourage teams of two or more people from a school or garden project to attend this workshop to strengthen your garden program. Teachers receive clock hours in this fun and rewarding workshop. Clock hours are included in the cost of the Workshop. 

Register by clicking on the link below, or you may register by paper and e-mail it to register@seattletilth.org, fax (206) 633-0450 or mail to 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N, Suite 100, Seattle, WA 98103.
 

Hosted By

Tilth Alliance

  • Phone: (206) 633-0451

For more information, go to: http://seattletilth.nonprofitsoapbox.com

May
4
6:30 pm18:30

MegaFires- Lands Council Spokane

901 W Sprague Ave, Spokane

Description

Co-hosted by Vaagen Brothers Lumber, Inc. and The Lands Council – May 4th at 6:30 pm at The Bing Crosby Theater.

Megafires, wildfires over 100,000 acres, and the destruction caused by them is a serious and growing issue to our region. Our communities, homes, businesses and our very way of life are threatened. If we are going to make effective progress towards increasing fire resiliency, we must increase awareness and stimulate conversation about this important issue across all levels of society. Through education, we firmly believe we can change the way we receive fire and smoke.

The Wildfire Project is a 60-minute, multi-media, traveling presentation hosted by Dr. Paul Hessburg (Pacific Northwest Research Station and the University of Washington), who has conducted fire and landscape ecology research for more than 27 years. The presented material comes in the form of fast-moving, short, topic-based talks interspersed with compelling video vignettes and features the work of wildfire photographer, John Marshall. Think TedX mixed with snappy documentary shorts and amazing photography. The videos are being created by award-winning documentary film company, North 40 Productions, of Wenatchee, WA.

Media is an effective way to educate and engage audiences with important topics that demand solutions. Coupling Paul Hessburg’s experience in this arena with North 40’s production technical savvy, this media will inform, engage and inspire audiences, as well as provide an effective educational tools for the many organizations who are working tirelessly to improve the wildfire situation.

For more information, go to: https://landscouncil.org/event/era-of-megafires/ 

May
5
May 7

Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival

Friday Early Location: Friday until 3PM Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge Office on Airport Way
Late Friday- Sunday Location: Hoquiam High School, Hoquiam WA.

Each spring, hundreds of thousands of shorebirds stop to rest and feed along the Washington Coast and in the Grays Harbor estuary during their migration northward. Coming from as far south as Argentina, these Arctic-bound shorebirds are among the world's greatest migrants. The concentration of birds during spring migration offers people a great chance to view a number of shorebird species. The shorebird spectacle happens every year at Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge and in other parts of the county.

People from around the world come to view this event of hemispheric importance. The festival works to bring people together for this incredible natural phenomenon. Contact Jennifer Cutillo, 360-753-9467.

For more information, go to: Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival

May
5
May 7

Orcas Island Bird Festival

Location: Orcas Island Chamber of Commerce, 65 North Beach Road, Eastsound, Washington 98245

The San Juans are lush with wildlife. And the Orcas Island Chamber of Commerce’s upcoming festival will pay tribute to the splendor of the outdoors. “In our fourth year, the festival will celebrate the wildlife in and around Orcas Island,” said Chamber Director Lance Evans. “Whether you are exploring on land or in the Salish Sea, we are encouraging everyone to take part.” Participants can enjoy nature talks, wildlife tours, and other activities. The festival is also partnering with chamber members to offer whale and wildlife tours. Outer Island Excursions, Deer Harbor Charters, Orcas Island Eclipse Charters, and Shearwater Kayak Adventures are participating. Contact 360-376-2273.

For more information, go to: Orcas Island Bird Festival

May
7
10:00 am10:00

UW Native Plant Nursery Sale- Student Run

Location: Douglas Research Conservatory, 3501 41st Street Seattle

The University of Washington's Seattle Native Plant Nursery, part of the Society for Ecological Restoration – UW Chapter (SER-UW), will be hosting a public plant sale on Sunday, May 7, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

The Native Plant Sale will feature more than 40 different species, from vanilla leaf to Douglas-fir, so come pick out your favorite plants and support your local student-run nursery!

Most of these plants are grown and propagated by students for other students’ projects and classes. Your support helps to keep them going and growing!

Learn more about SER-UW and the Native Plant Nursery, connect with them on Facebook, and feel free to contact the nursery managers, Derek Allen and Kimmy Ertel, by email anytime.

Hope you can make the sale!

May
12
May 14

Yakima River Canyon Bird Fest

Location: Yakima River Canyon Scenic Byway, Ellensburg, Washington

Come bird with KEEN for 3 days during the second weekend of May and discover the natural beauty of Central Washington State! Kittitas County features diverse and spectacular habitats ranging from snow-capped mountains, thousands of acres of public forest, lush riparian corridors, and endangered shrub-steppe open space. The Yakima River Canyon is an Audubon Important Bird Area (IBA) with some of the highest densities of passerines and birds of prey in the State, some of them obligates to the shrub-steppe habitat. The Yakima River Canyon Bird Fest will offer expert-led field trips, keynote speakers including Paul Bannick, vendors, extended field trips, social events and music, and a plethora of early spring bird watching! Contact: Jill Scheffer, kittitasee@gmail.com, 509-551-8807.

For more information, go to: Yakima River Canyon Bird Fest

May
13
11:00 am11:00

Stillwaters- EcoFest 2017

EcoFest 2017 - Love Your Mother Earth

Stillwaters Environmental Center

Location: Stillwaters Environmental Center
26059 NE Barber Cut Off Rd
Kingston, WA 98346

Join us for an interactive and exciting twist on the day, a community science and nature festival where you can get connected to what you can do for Earth. Come and discover what Stillwaters’ science is all about, too. Get off your sofa and protect our Earth! We’ll have community places you can volunteer or become an advocate for Earth. Speak up, sign up, and demonstrate your love for Mother Earth. Plus, visit and enjoy the Stillwaters campus with your family: learn about West Sound Wildlife’s critter ambassadors, lunch on delicious food from Olympic Barbecue. 

Park at Bayside Church or the Kingston Farmer’s Market/Kingston Boating Opening Day and ride the free shuttle van to EcoFest!

Thanks to our EcoFest Supporters for making this a FREE event for all! They are West Sound Wildlife Shelter, Power Trip Energy, and Friends of Miller Bay.

For more information, go to: Stillwater Environmental Center

May
13
1:00 pm13:00

Vancouver WA Water Resource Center: Wetlands

Second Saturdays at the Water Resources Education Center are not only fun, they're free! Each second Saturday of the month, from 1 to 3 p.m., kids and their families are invited to explore a different topic through hands-on activities, games and stories.

May: Wetlands
Did you know that the Water Center manages nearly 50 acres of wetlands? Explore this beautiful habitat while on a short walk to view wetlands wildlife. Then, head inside for kid-friendly crafts, games and science experiments showcasing how wetlands protect and support our community.

For more information, visit the: Vancouver Water Resource Center

 

May
17
7:00 pm19:00

Sound Conversations: The Making of Mystery Sharks, a KCTS 9 Wildlife Detectives Documentary

Sound Conversations with Jeff Renner & Michael Werner, The Making of Mystery Sharks, a KCTS 9 Wildlife Detectives Documentary

Location: Seattle Aquarium
Fees: $10 each advance/$8 Aquarium members. $15 day of event

Explore the science and lore of one of the ocean's largest and most mysterious predators, the sixgill shark. Usually it swims the world’s ocean at abysmal depths, but here in Puget Sound divers can interact with it in relatively shallow water. Michael Werner, five-time Emmy-award-winning filmmaker and journalist, and researchers from the Seattle Aquarium will take you beneath the surface to discover this seldom-seen giant, to learn its story and to understand the challenges facing the massive sharks…and what it means for our region.

For more information, go to: Seattle Aquarium Events

May
18
May 21

Leavenworth Spring BirdFest

Location: Wenatchee River Institute, Barn Beach Reserve, 347 Division Street, Leavenworth, Washington

Come bird with us the third weekend in May and celebrate the 15th anniversary of the Leavenworth Spring BirdFest! Enjoy the unforgettable experience of witnessing the vast array of returning migratory birds in the midst of the peak wildflower season in the incomparable natural beauty of North Central Washington's Wenatchee Valley. The Leavenworth area features spectacular habitats ranging from snow-capped mountains to sunny ponderosa pine forests, lush riparian zones to shrub-steppe. Educational and recreational opportunities abound with field trips led by area birding and wildlife experts and professionals. While birding is the heart of the weekend, activities also include wildflower walks, art events, and family activities to ensure fun and learning for birders and outdoor enthusiasts of all ages and skill levels. Contact: Wenatchee River Institute Programs programs@wenatcheeriverinstitute.org 509-548-0181, x4.

For more information, go to: Leavenworth Spring BirdFest

May
20
9:00 am09:00

Garden Educator Workshop Spring Seminar 3: Seattle

Garden Educator Workshop Spring Seminar 3: Eat

Hosted by Tilth Alliance @ Good Shepherd Center, Room 107

Save $20 by registering for all three Spring Seminars! The dates are March 25, April 29 and May 20. To receive the discounted rate, purchase an individual ticket of $250 ($225 for members) on the first day – you will be automatically registered for all three seminars.

Immerse yourself in outdoor teaching techniques and schoolyard gardening! Learn how to grow an effective and robust schoolyard garden program.

Garden Educator Workshop: Spring Seminar 3: Eat
Seminar 3 wraps up the series to help teachers, parents and garden volunteers prepare to manage their gardens during the summer at the height of the growing season – an important part of year-round garden planning, especially for schools. Explore diverse ways of learning and taste the fruits of your labor!

Seminar participants will:

·         explore multiple models for summer garden management
·         learn what to plant and how to sustain production for the beginning of the next school year
·         harvest and prepare a simple garden meal to share with one another
·         practice how to lead basic cooking activities with students
·         experience hands-on lessons about insects and the garden ecosystem
·         discuss Integrated Pest Management practices
·         learn ways to measure what and how much students are learning in the garden

In the garden, we will tend and harvest plants that were started in Seminars 1 and 2, learn different harvesting techniques and explore watering methods. This session is a great way to wrap up the three-part series and incorporate what you've learned into a vision of success for your garden and students.

Hands-on, outdoor garden education is part of every seminar. Come dressed for the weather and prepared to have fun and get a little dirty!


We highly encourage teams of two or more people from a school or garden project to attend this workshop to strengthen your garden program. Teachers receive clock hours in this fun and rewarding workshop. Clock hours are included in the cost of the Workshop.

Register by clicking on the link below, or you may register by paper and e-mail it to register@seattletilth.org, fax (206) 633-0450 or mail to 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N, Suite 100, Seattle, WA 98103.
 

Hosted By: Tilth Alliance

  • Phone: (206) 633-0451
May
27
May 28

Brinnon ShrimpFest

Brinnon ShrimpFest is a Memorial Weekend festival located on the Hood Canal in Brinnon, WA. This community event is a celebration of Hood Canal Spot Shrimp and other local seafood. It features belt sander races, arts and craft booths, live music, kids activities, delicious food, great fun and shrimp! Limited quantities of Hood Canal Shrimp for sale! Bring along your favorite decorated belt sander to enter the races that will be held at 11AM and 3PM.

The tides are usually low enough during this weekend for easy harvest of clams and oysters on the public beaches near the festival (license required) and the weather is traditionally good during this holiday weekend. This is great family fun! Hours: Sat 10-6, Sun 10-5 Proceeds from ShrimpFest will be donated to community projects.

For more information, go to: http://www.experiencewa.com/wa/events

Jun
3
9:30 am09:30

Woodland Park Zoo- FREE- Educator Appreciation Day

Come explore the zoo for a day - on us!

On Saturday, June 3rd we invite preK-20 formal and informal educators to visit the zoo for free and receive half-priced admission for one adult guest!  

Please check in at the South Entrance between 9:30 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. for your ticket into the zoo.  You are welcome to stay until closing time but check-in will end at 3:00 p.m.  Please bring something to verify your employment as an educator.

We would love for you to use this day to both enjoy the zoo and explore opportunities to include the zoo in your curriculum.

There will be a variety of events including Bear Affair: Living Northwest Conservation Day, along with all of our summer programming (starts May 1st).

Please contact the registrar with any questions (schools@zoo.org or 206.548.2424).

For more information: Visit Woodland Park Zoo for Educators

Jun
3
9:30 am09:30

Woodland Park Zoo Educator Appreciation Day

WOODLAND PARK ZOO

EDUCATOR APPRECATION DAY – SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 2017

Come explore the zoo for a day - on us!

On Saturday, June 3rd we invite preK-20 formal and informal educators to visit the zoo for free and receive half-priced admission for one adult guest! 

Please check in at the South Entrance between 9:30 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. for your ticket into the zoo.  You are welcome to stay until closing time but check-in will end at 3:00 p.m. 

Please bring something to verify your employment as an educator.

We would love for you to use this day to both enjoy the zoo and explore opportunities to include the zoo in your curriculum. There will be a variety of events including Bear Affair: Living Northwest Conservation Day, along with all of our summer programming (starts May 1st). Please contact the registrar with any questions (schools@zoo.org or 206.548.2424).

We look forward to seeing you!

Jun
10
1:00 pm13:00

Vancouver WA National Get Outdoors Day

Second Saturdays at the Water Resources Education Center are not only fun, they're free! Each second Saturday of the month, from 1 to 3 p.m., kids and their families are invited to explore a different topic through hands-on activities, games and stories.

June: National Get Outdoors Day
The Water Center’s regular June Second Saturday will celebrate National Get Outdoors Day at the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Enjoy a fun-filled day of activities to help get you and your family outdoors! Attend National Get Outdoors Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 10, at the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, 1500 East 5th Street, Vancouver, Washington.

For more information, visit: Vancouver Water Resource Center

Jun
24
Jun 25

Kitsap Peninsula Water Trails Festiva

Location: Silverdale Waterfront Park
8801 Washington Ave NW, Silverdale, WA 98383

Enjoy live music, good food, and family fun as we celebrate our 3rd Annual Kitsap Peninsula Nation Water Trails Festival! There will be games for all ages, organized paddles of various difficulty levels, vendors, water safety demonstrations, and so much more.

For a more information, visit www.watertrailsfestival.com

Aug
18
Aug 19

National Lentil Festival- Pullman, WA

Location: Pullman, WA

"Since its beginning in 1989, the National Lentil Festival has brought national attention to Pullman. The Palouse region of farmlands in Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho has a reputation for producing the highest quality lentils in the United States. We think that is worth celebrating."

A major highlight of this festival is the Legendary Lentil Cook Off. Learn about growing, processing, warehousing, and merchandising peas, lentils and chickpeas.

For more information, go to National Lentil Festival


Apr
25
12:00 pm12:00

NAAEE Webinar "Wild Contagious Hope"

Please join us for the next installment of NAAEE's monthly webinar series (Bringing New Ideas and Innovation to the field of EE). On Tuesday, April 25 from 3-4 pm EST, we will hear from Dr. Elin Kelsey presenting "Wild Contagious Hope."  

On World Ocean's Day, June 8, 2014  Elin Kelsey co-launched a twitter tag called  #OceanOptimism. To her surprise, it went viral, engaging more than 74 million people with marine conservation successes. #OceanOptimism is a harbinger of a collective hunger for hope. Drawing on inspiring examples from Monterey Bay and beyond,  Elin chronicles the spectacular rise of this turn toward hope and why it is so unlikely – and so important – to an increasingly fractured world drowning in doom and gloom.

Register now and we will send you the recording if you are not able to make it!

To register or to find out more, go to: Bringing New Ideas and Innovation to the field of EE

Apr
22
9:00 am09:00

Tour: Exploring Eastern Washington’s Mammoth Steppe

Location: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Avenue, Spokane, w, 99201

Cost: $90 Members, $100 Non-Members

Tour Description: Join us as renowned University of Michigan Paleontologist Dr. Daniel Fisher, and local author and naturalist Jack Nisbet lead this half-day guided bus tour and journey through the flood-carved landscapes near the Palouse Hills along Pine and Hangman Creeks. Places of interest that will be viewed include the Donahoe and Coplen homesteads, where fossil mammoth discoveries in the 1870s caused a local sensation and helped to scientifically define the species known today as the Columbian mammoth. Tour participants will hike among the trees, shrubs, and wildflowers that supported this Ice Age fauna, and try to visualize what life was like for the great beasts. Program includes a boxed lunch.

About the Tour Guides: 

Daniel Fisher is on the faculty of the University of Michigan and is a Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Claude W. Hibbard Collegiate Professor of Paleontology, and the Curator and Director of the University’s Museum of Paleontology. Dr. Fisher is also guest curator for the Field Museum’s traveling exhibition, “Titans of the Ice Age: Mammoths and Mastodons,” now showing at the Northwest Museum of Arts + Culture. He was one of the international team of scientists to work with Lyuba, the best preserved baby mammoth ever found. His research on mammoth tusks has informed our understanding of mammoth life: for example, how well they ate, whether they grew well or poorly, and in which seasons this growth took place. Educationally, Dr. Fisher completed his undergraduate and graduate work in geological sciences at Harvard University, earning his Ph.D. in 1975. 

Jack Nisbet is a Spokane-based teacher, naturalist, and author whose scholarly interests focus on the intersection of human and natural history in the Pacific Northwest. He has written numerous books about the Northwest, including, “The Collector,” “David Douglas: A Naturalist at Work,” “Visible Bones,” and “Ancient Places: People and Landscape in the Emerging Northwest.” He is a graduate of Stanford University. 

Apr
20
7:00 pm19:00

WET Science Center- Olympia Oysters

SSEA’s Discovery Speaker Series @ WET Science Center

April 20: Olympia Oysters – “Are native Olympia oysters making a comeback?” by Dr. Bonnie Becker, Associate Professor of Marine Ecology, University of Washington

SSEA Discovery Speaker Series features guest speakers in a variety of topics of environmental education in the Puget Sound Area. Please join us for an evening of information and sharing at LOTT’s WET Science Center on the 3rd Thursday of the Month October through April, excluding December from 7:00 – 8:30 pm  (doors open at 6:30).SSEA Vision is to create an educated community that is engaged and inspired to promote the ongoing health, conservation and restoration of Puget Sound. Please come and enjoy.

For more information, go to: http://www.wetsciencecenter.org/events/

Apr
18
7:00 pm19:00

Wenatchee Environmental Film & Lecture Series: The Buzz on Native Bees

Location: Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center, 127 South Mission Street
Wenatchee, WA

Most people have no idea that there are at least 600 species of   native bees in Washington State. Some are yet to be discovered, and many (about 10 percent of species in Washington State)  do not have names. With meticulous care, Dr. Don Rolfs, a life-long   naturalist and retired dentist, is building a field guide. He hopes to inspire an appreciation for the rich diversity of native bees and their vital role in pollination. “If we care about flowers and food, we should care about native bees,” Rolfs says.

This event is being sponsored by Wenatchee River Institute.

For more information, visit: Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center

Apr
13
7:00 pm19:00

Magic of Cinema | Plastic Ocean

Location: Peninsula College, Maier Performance Hall, Port Angeles WA

A feature-length adventure documentary that brings to light the consequences of our global disposable lifestyle. The screening will be followed by a 30 minute panel discussion with representatives from several conservation agencies. Local marine debris artist, Sarah Tucker, will display some of her sculptures at the event. Co-sponsored by NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and Washington CoastSavers. 

For more information, go to: Peninsula College, the Magic of Cinema

Apr
13
12:30 pm12:30

Service Learning- Port Angeles- Fostering a Culture of Civic Engagement

Jennifer Santry will present “Service Learning:  Fostering a Culture of Civic Engagement, Solidarity, and Empathy”

Santry will be joined by a panel of students who will share short presentations focused on their service learning (SL) projects here at PC. Santry is a faculty member and has coordinated service learning through her continued efforts to create connections and opportunities that address social and environmental concerns in our community. In addition, Santry designed and implemented the Sustainable Agriculture certificate program at Peninsula College.

For more information, go to: Peninsula College

 

Apr
8
7:30 pm19:30

The Songs of the Trees- Seattle Town Hall

Location: Town Hall Seattle • 1119 Eighth Avenue • Seattle, WA • 98101

Of his writing, biology professor and writer David Haskell says, “I’ve turned my ear to trees, listening to their ‘songs.’ I’m writing about what tree acoustics can teach us, with a particular focus on biological networks.” His award-winning The Forest Unseen won praise for eloquent writing and deep engagement with the natural world. Now, Haskell brings his powers of observation to the biological networks that surround all species, including humans. Selecting a dozen trees around the world, he explores the their interactions with their surroundings, whether beneficial or destructive. Haskell will discuss the discoveries he made during this process and his belief that every living being is not only sustained by biological connections, but is made from these relationships. He reveals a networked view of life enriching our understanding of biology, human nature, and ethics.

For more information, go to: https://townhallseattle.org/event/

Apr
8
5:00 pm17:00

Spokane Lands Council Annual April Showers Auction

Save the date for The Lands Council’s 22nd Annual April Showers Auction & Dinner on Saturday, April 8th at The Grand Hotel. Location: 333 W. Spokane Falls Boulevard

Please join us for a wonderful evening of great friends, a delicious dinner, fantastic live and silent auction items – and most importantly – supporting the restoration and revitalization of your Inland Northwest forests, water, and wildlife.

For more information, go to: https://landscouncil.org/event/22nd-annual-april-showers-auction-dinner/

Apr
8
1:00 pm13:00

Vancouver WA Water Resource Center: Second Saturday

Second Saturdays at the Water Resources Education Center are not only fun, they're free! Each second Saturday of the month, from 1 to 3 p.m., kids and their families are invited to explore a different topic through hands-on activities, games and stories.

April: Critter Count
Celebrate Earth Month and explore the important roles reptiles and amphibians (herps) play in nature’s ecosystems. Families are invited to view a variety of unusual snakes, lizards and other cold blooded animals during live critters shows at 1 and 2 p.m. Learn about fascinating creatures that slither, crawl and climb! If you have ever thought about keeping herps as pets, find out which ones are good for beginners. Discover simple things you can do in your yard to attract and protect frogs and other wildlife.

For more information, go to: Vancouver WA Water Resource Center

Apr
8
9:00 am09:00

Volunteer Environmental docents needed at Lake Samm. St park

Location: Lake Sammamish State Park Office
2000 NW Sammamish Rd, Issaquah, WA 98027

Instructor: WA State Parks & Rec and FLSSP

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, in partnership with the Friends of Lake Sammamish State Park (FLSSP), is offering training to people interested in becoming environmental stewards and education volunteers at the park. The materials cost for the training is $20 or $10 for seniors or students. Lake Sammamish State Park volunteer docents assist park rangers with a variety of programs, including nature hikes, educational crafting activities, formal school programs and drop-in educational stations. The training culminates with participants leading short activities during the park's Earth Day Celebration on April 22. Park staff will introduce trainees to environmental education, curriculum, methods and techniques. Participants who successfully complete the training will receive a docent certification and be eligible to lead programs at the park., Volunteers will be required to give back 10 hours of service to the park following training. Register via the links below or For more information about the training, please contact Janet Farness, executive director of FSSLP, (425) 577-3657 or director@flssp.org.

To Register, or for more information, go to: Lake Sammamish State Park

Apr
7
7:00 pm19:00

The Memory of Fish- Port Angeles

Location: Port Angeles WA
Maier Performance Hall and the Little Theater
, Peninsula College

Cost: Tickets are $5 at the door. Students are free.

The Memory of Fish is a documentary portrait of the intertwined lives of Dick Goin and wild fish and his fight to free a river. Elwha River salmon fed Dick and his family after they migrated to the Olympic Peninsula during the Dust Bowl. He never forgot his debt to the now disappearing fish. We follow Dick—a pulp mill worker and master fisherman—as he uses his memories and persistence to battle for the biggest dam removal project in US history so that the salmon can come home.

This screening is co-sponsored by American Rivers, The Salmon Coalition, and The North Olympic Land Trust.  The screening in the Little Theater will be followed by a question-and-answer session with the director, Jennifer Galvin, and co-producer Emma Jones will answer questions in Maier Performance Hall.

For more information, go to: Peninsula College Magic of Cinema

Apr
7
9:00 am09:00

Badger Mountain Geology Hike- Lake Lewis

Prosser- Sunnyside area
Join geologist George Last on a 3-mile, 1/2 day hike to the top of Badger Mountain, elevation gain of 800 ft.  Learn about Lake Lewis, the Ice Age floods, the Rattlesnake – Wallula lineament, and the basalt-lava flows.  The hike stats at the Dallas Road (Skyline) Trailhead and ends at the Canyon Trailhead where a bus will take guests back to Dallas Road.  This hike is organized by the Hanford Reach Interpretive Center in partnership with the Lake Lewis Chapter of the Ice Age Flood Institute.  Bus transportation between trailheads is included.

For more information, and to register: Click Here

Apr
7
Apr 9

Cascade Climate Network: Youth Climate Network

This year the Spring Fling will be at Reed College in Portland!

We often consider the Pacific Northwest (and Portland) to contain the archetypes of environmentally sustainable cities.  However, research on environmental inequality has shown that minorities and low-income communities in urban settings are exposed to the bulk of environmental toxins.  This clarifies a major intersection in the environmental and social justice movements.  This intersection is especially salient in the Pacific Northwest, where we pride ourselves on sustainability.  Environmental issues cannot be addressed without addressing social justice issues and vice versa.  This semester, the Cascade Climate Network will focus on this intersection and what we, as environmentalists, can do to address these issues.

To register or to find out more, visit the Cascade Climate Network.

If you have any questions, please contact Bella Brownwood at belbrownw@reed.edu

Apr
6
Apr 7

Sound Conversations: The Science and Spirit of the Ocean

Sound Conversations with Jeff Renner & Jonathan White
TIDES: The Science and Spirit of the Ocean

Location: Seattle Aquarium
Fees: $10 each advance/$8 Aquarium members. $15 day of event

Journey around the globe with writer, sailor and surfer Jonathan White to discover the science and spirit of ocean tides. From shimmying under the ice in the Arctic to hunt for mussels, to investigating the growth of tidal power generation in Chile and Scotland, this story of adventure travel combined with provocative scientific inquiry leads us to the exploration of the force that keeps our planet’s waters in constant motion, and how it affects us—often in surprising and unexpected ways.

For more information: http://www.seattleaquarium.org/upcoming-events

Apr
5
6:00 pm18:00

Mason Conservation District Workshop: FERTILIZING WITH MANURE

MASON CONSERVATION DISTRICT

Workshop: GREENER PASTURES, BOUNTIFUL GARDENS: FERTILIZING WITH MANURE

Workshop: GREENER PASTURES, BOUNTIFUL GARDENS: FERTILIZING WITH MANURE
Location: Mason Conservation District Office
450 W Business Park RD
Shelton, WA 98584

Thinking about fertilizing your pastures, fields, or gardens in preparation for the upcoming growing season? Wanting to take advantage of fertilizing with free manure?

Join Mason Conservation District for this special workshop:

Greener Pastures, Bountiful Gardens: Fertilizing with Manure

Dr. Nichole Emberston of Whatcom Conservation District will present on how to determine the right amount, the right place, and the right time to use manure to fertilize your pastures, fields, and gardens.

Registration is required. Contact Amy at 360-427-9436 ext. 112 or arosen@masoncd.org to reserve a spot.

For more information, go to: Mason Conservation District

Apr
3
4:30 pm16:30

WWU: Huxley Environmental Career & Internship Fair

Location: Western Washington University Huxley College, Viking Union Multipurpose Room

This annual event is co-sponsored by the Career Services Center and Huxley College of the Environment.  Participants include U.S. Forest Service-Mount Baker Ranger District, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington State Department of Ecology, Canopy Tours Northwest and more. For a complete list of participating employers visit our website.

Students interested in business and sustainability are also invited to attend a presentation prior to the Huxley Fair from 1-3:30 p.m. in the Viking Union Room 462, “Sustainability Jobs: The Complete Guide to Landing Your Dream Green Job” by Kevin Wilhelm, CEO of Sustainable Business Consulting. To find out more and/or register, email Ed Weber at ed.weber@wwu.edu.

Mar
31
7:00 pm19:00

An Evening with Elizabeth Gilbert

March 31, Friday, doors open 6:30 pm
Sponsored by: IslandWood, Washington Women's Foundation, and STG
Location: The Moore Theatre, Seattle WA

Join us in Seattle at The Moore Theatre for An Evening with Elizabeth Gilbert and explore the power of voice, discovery of self, and our connection to the natural world. Elizabeth Gilbert is often recognized by her bestselling titles Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, The Signature of All Things and Eat, Pray, Love. We hope to see you there!

Mar
29
7:00 pm19:00

Walla Walla Movie- SEED: The Untold Story

SEED: The Untold Story - a documentary film

Location: Gesa Power House Theatre 111 North 6th Ave Walla Walla WA

Gesa Power House Theatre presents the Walla Walla premiere of the award-winning documentary “SEED: The Untold Story” on Wednesday, March 29, at 7:00 p.m. The film’s co-director and co-producer Jon Betz, a Walla Walla native, will participate in a talkback session following the screening.

Few things on Earth are as miraculous and vital as seeds. Worshipped and treasured since the dawn of humankind. “SEED: The Untold Story” follows passionate seed keepers protecting our 12,000 year-old food legacy. In the last century, 94% of our seed varieties have disappeared. As biotech chemical companies control the majority of our seeds, farmers, scientists, lawyers, and indigenous seed keepers fight a David and Goliath battle to defend the future of our food. In a harrowing and heartening story, these reluctant heroes rekindle a lost connection to our most treasured resource and revive a culture connected to seeds.

The film features Vandana Shiva, Dr. Jane Goodall, Andrew Kimbrell, Winona Laduke and Raj Patel.

General admission tickets ($15 Adults, $10 Students, including ticket fees) are available online (www.phtww.com) or by calling the box office at 509-529-6500 or at the door.

For more information, go to Walla Walla Events

Mar
28
9:00 am09:00

Chelan Earth Day Fair

Location: Riverwalk Park, Chelan WA
117 E Wapato Ave
Chelan, WA 98816

Dont miss this fun family friendly event!

FREE childrens' activities, arts/crafts, food & LOADS more. To find out more, click here.

Thinking of coming down to join us at the fair? Wondering what it will be like? Along with a fantastic family outing you can expect the following:

-Garden Center
-Gardening demonstrations throughout the day
-Book Sale
-Childrens activities
-DIY exhibitors
-Music, and entertainment
-Food
-Educational displays/activities
-Hybrid/Electric/Plug-in vehicles
-Electric Bikes, safety & bike trip info
-Solar oven baked cookies!
-Solar fountain
-Forest Service/Fire ecology, Columbia Breaks Fire Interp. Ctr.
-WSU Co-op extension
-Chelan & Manson Fire district & EMS
-Recycling, waste reduction, chlorine-free cleaners, cleaning alternatives, cooperative bulk buying
-Local farms, gardening, farmers market, plant sales, Master Gardners, composting, worm composting, Xeriscape, noxious weed abatement
-Green Building materials & business information
-Plastics and water bottle information
-Landscape conservation/Land Trust, Cascadia Conservation District
-Emergency Preparedness
-MAKER booth
Mar
25
9:00 am09:00

Garden Educator Workshop: Spring Seminar 1: Seattle

Garden Educator Workshop Spring Seminar 1: Learn

 

Saturday, March 25, 2017 (9:00AM - 4:00PM)

Hosted by Tilth Alliance @ Good Shepherd Center, Room 107

Save $20 by registering for all three Spring Seminars! The dates are March 25, April 29 and May 20. To receive the discounted rate, purchase an individual ticket of $250 ($225 for members) – you will be automatically registered for all three seminars.

Immerse yourself in outdoor teaching techniques and schoolyard gardening! Learn how to grow an effective and robust schoolyard garden program.

Garden Educator Workshop: Spring Seminar 1: Learn

During the first seminar, participants develop a foundation of understanding about school learning gardens. We will build upon that knowledge and experience during the following two seminars.  

Participants will learn:
·         the basics of place-based education and the experiential learning model
·         basic organic gardening practices
·         how Next Generation Science Standards complement outdoor garden learning
·         effective outdoor classroom management techniques
·         basic garden design for new and existing spaces

Participants will join in hands-on activities outside in the garden, focused on soil, composting and early spring gardening practices. Projects will include soil preparation, testing soil temperature and planting cool season seeds and transplants. No experience necessary! Delve into lively discussions and classroom presentations.  Experience garden lessons from both a student and instructor perspective and leave feeling confident to teach in your outdoor space.  

Hands-on, outdoor garden education is part of every seminar. Come dressed for the weather and prepared to have fun and get a little dirty!

We highly encourage teams of two or more people from a school or garden project to attend this workshop to strengthen your garden program. Teachers receive clock hours in this fun and rewarding workshop. Don't forget to sign up for Spring Seminar 2: Grow and Spring Seminar 3: Eat!

Register by clicking on the link below, or you may register by paper and e-mail it to register@seattletilth.org, fax (206) 633-0450 or mail to 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N, Suite 100, Seattle, WA 98103.
 

Hosted By: Tilth Alliance

  • Phone: (206) 633-0451

For more information, go to: http://seattletilth.nonprofitsoapbox.com/-teacher-training-a-intensive-courses/event/708

Mar
24
Mar 26

Othello Sandhill Crane Festival

It’s time to begin making plans to attend the 2017 Othello Sandhill Crane Festival, you will never find so many Ice Age Floods-related lectures and tours in one place.  This year the Crane Festival will be held on March 24, 25, and 26. This festival is becoming a viable vehicle for the Ice Age Flood Institute’s goal of having an annual Floodfest celebration.  Friday the 24th, Nick Zentner will give a talk that will summarize the general Ice Age Floods story.  Saturday the 25th will be the day most of the IAFI’s lectures will be heard.  Sunday the 26th will showcase most of our flood-related geologic tours.  We have added one additional tour this year.  Karl Lillquist will be conducting our first tour of the western Quincy Basin. The Othello Sandhill Crane Festival website will be available soon to register for these tours. 

There will be one Ice Age Flood Institute tour on Saturday (March 25, 2017):

  • Ice Age Floods and the Channeled Scablands Tour:  Led by Brent Cunderla after his morning lecture, this trip will emphasize the geologyand catastrophic Ice AgeFlood features found near Othello and Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.  A visit to the Drumheller Channels (a National Park Service National Landmark managed by Columbia NWR), scabland topography andice-rafted boulders, or erratics, will be the highlights of the trip.  Brent has spent the last 25 years with the Bureau of Land Management in Wenatchee and has been actively exploring the late Pleistocene glacial geology, particularly theIce Age Floods features of North Central Washington.  There will be one stop for facilities and no lunch on this trip, so please plan accordingly.

There are six Ice Age Flood Institute tours on Sunday (March 25, 2017):

  • Western Quincy Basin Tour:  Karl Lillquist will lead an all-day bus tour of the western portion of the Quincy Basin.  Ice Age Floods entered the Quincy Basin from the northeast and east.  Some of this water drained from the basin through the Drumheller Channels to the south.  The remainder flowed west exiting the basin through Frenchman Coulee, Potholes Coulee, and Crater Coulee on the western edge of the Quincy Basin.  We will examine the landform and sediment evidence for the catastrophic flood origins and evolution of each of these western flood outlets on several short (less than 1.5 mile) hikes.  You will see giant basalt columns, dry falls, potholes, plunge pools, buttes, mesas, flood bars, and more.  In addition we will explore the overall physical and human geography of the area.
     
  • Upper Grand Coulee Tour:  Gene Kiver will take you on an all-day bus tour that will “fight” your way upstream from Othello through the Summer Falls floodway to the Upper Grand Coulee where you will examine some of the evidence and features produced by the Missoula Floods.  Floodwaters were hundreds to almost 1,000 feet deep along the tour route and produced the spectacular Grand Coulee canyon.  Features include abandoned waterfalls, the Coulee Monocline, Steamboat Rock, and ending up at Grand Coulee Dam.  You will return to Othello through both the Upper and Lower Grand Coulee.  Time permitting; we may make additional field stops.  Bring lunch , water, and snacks.
     
  • Lower Grand Coulee Geology Tour:  Join John Moody, President of the Lower Grand Coulee chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute, civil and water resources engineer as you travel north and west on McManamon Road through the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge to the Drumheller Channels National Landmark overlook.  Walk out to the overlook for a presentation.  You will then travel west to view granite erratics alongside Frenchman Hills, and north to Neva Lake.  You will walk to Sundial and view Soap Lake (original plunge pool site) and the Lower Grand Coulee Monocline.  Then travel to Lake Lenore Caves and walk around and enjoy your lunch.  You will have the opportunity to view a few overlooks, Rim Rock Meadows, Sage Brush Flats Plateau and visit Monster Rock in the Ephrata Fan.  On your way back you will visit the Coulee Corridor National Scenic Byway.
     
  • Hanford Reach Interpretive Center and Coyote Canyon:  The Coyote Canyon Mammoth Site is an on-going paleo-ecological excavation located southwest of Kennewick.  The 17,449 year-old mammoth bones are buried in Missoula Floods sediments.  The Mid-Columbia Basin Old Natural Education Sciences (MCBONES) Research Center Foundation is a nonprofit educational organization registered with the state and federal governments and acts as an oversight and support entity for the project.  Gary Kleinknecht will take you to the dig and Dig House, a 40×40 feet pole building set up as classroom, laboratory and museum area, and the actual site.  Dress according to the weather and bring snacks and drink.  This trip will also take you to The Hanford Reach Interpretive Center (REACH) in Richland.  If you have not visited the REACH, here is your chance to see an amazing building with exhibits on the region’s natural history and Hanford.
     
  • Ice Age Floods Geology of the Drumheller Channels Hike:  A 5-6 mile hike, led by geologist Bruce Bjornstad, of moderate difficulty will directly explore the evidence for the Ice Age floods within the Drumheller Channels, a dramatically eroded landscape carved out by repeated Ice Age floods as recently as 13,000 years ago.  Bring sturdy footwear, camera, and lunch; bus transportation provided.
     
  • Palouse Falls Tour:  Lloyd Stoess and Ken Lacy will be your hosts on a tour of the Glacial Lake Missoula floodwaters that flowed through the Cheney-Palouse flood route.  The catastrophic flooding amounted to as much as nine million cubic meters of water per second, creating the landscape we see today throughout the Columbia Basin.  View some of the most spectacular examples of flood-relatedgeologic activity found anywhere in the world.  Highlights of the tour include Collier Coulee, Staircase Rapids spillway, Palouse-Snake River Divide, Washtucna Coulee, Mid-Canyon Bar, Devil’s Canyon, and of course, the spectacular Palouse Falls.

Finally, for those of you who will be needing accommodations, be aware that Othello is only a 22 minute drive from six large motels located at the intersection of I-90 and Hwy. 17. The needed information about these motels will appear on the IAFI website soon.

Mar
22
7:00 pm19:00

Yakama WSU: The Carbon Connection: Soil Climate Solutions

Location: Pacific Northwest University, 200 University Parkway, Yakima, WA 98901

Soil is life, and life is carbon. The carbon and organic matter in soil plays an important role in capturing greenhouse gases, protecting water resources, and feeding a growing planet. How we treat soil on farms, in cities, and in our backyards is an important part of the solution to many of the global environmental dilemmas we face.

This class will cover how to build organic matter, manage nutrients, develop natural soil communities, and promote other ecosystem benefits to grow gardens, cities, and farms that are not only more bountiful, but more climate friendly as well.

E.A. Murphy is a soil scientist and author of Building Soil: A Down-to-Earth Approach (Cool Springs Press, 2015). Her passion for growing food led to a master’s degree from University of California, Davis, where she researched the fundamentals of soil organic matter and sustainable ways to improve it. She has worked on farms, with urban gardens, in environmental restoration, in agroecological research, and as a faculty instructor for Oregon State University Extension. With twenty years of hands-on practical experience and the latest research in soil health to back her up, she shares the simple truth that to grow more, we need to do less. She has shared the message of living soil with audiences across the country, including appearances on King 5’s New Day Northwest, WHYY’s You Bet Your Garden, and PRI’s Science Friday.

Based in Tacoma, Washington, Ea offers classes and workshops, one-on-one consultation services, and online soil and garden support and resources at her website www.dirtsecrets.com. One thing she believes: the future health of our planet depends on us all bringing soil to life, wherever we are.

This is the third of four great lectures as part of the Master Gardener Spring Symposium! 

For more information, or to purchase tickets, go to: http://extension.wsu.edu/yakima/event

Mar
22
6:30 pm18:30

An Overview of the Most Recent Ice Age Floods in the Pacific Northwest

Location: Northwest Museum of Arts + Culture. Eric A. Johnston Auditorium, 2316 W. First Avenue, Spokane, Washington, 99201, United States

Cost: $9, suggested donation

This program, let by Ice Age Floods Institute President Dr. Gary Ford, will review some of the evidence for the Ice Age floods by following them “downstream” from western Montana to the Pacific Ocean.

Dr. Ford will also discuss some landscapes that are the direct result of multiple Ice Age floods which occurred between ca. 15,550 and 13,350 BP.

About the Presenter: Gary Ford is the current president of the Ice Age Floods Institute. He has taught soil science classes at Montana State University and the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, and worked as a soil scientist for the Idaho Panhandle National Forests, where he mapped more than a million acres and worked as the regional soils correlator. He was also a member of the Landscape Ecology Team that worked on the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management project; and the Forest Planner on the Idaho Panhandle National Forests and co-leader of the Forest Plan Revision Team for the Idaho Panhandle and Kootenai National Forests. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Earth Science, and a Ph.D. in Soil Science from Montana State University. 

Mar
22
6:00 pm18:00

Annie Marie Musselman- SE Seattle- Wolf Haven: Sanctuary and the Future of Wolves

Location: The Royal Room, Columbia City
Free, but advanced sale tickets required



Seward Park Audubon Center is thrilled to welcome Annie Marie Musselman to The Royal Room to present images and speak about her latest book, Wolf Haven. Annie Marie was given the rare opportunity to observe and photograph the wolves of Wolf Haven International, a sanctuary located near Mount Rainier that provides a home for captive-born and displaced wolves. Annie Marie's striking images express the wild spirit of these beautiful animals and the accompanying text written by Brenda Peterson gives you a deeper look at the behavioral patterns and social structures of these complex creatures.

This is part of Seward Park Audubon Center's Urban Naturalist Series connecting authors, artists and naturalists with the southeast Seattle community.

For more information, go to: Seward Park Audubon

Mar
21
7:00 pm19:00

Wenatchee Environmental Film & Lecture Series: The Bluebird Man

Location: Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center, 127 South Mission Street
Wenatchee, WA United States

Al Larson was one of the first citizen scientists to take up the North American Bluebird Society call to action in 1978. Since then, the 91-year-old has developed a string of 300 nest boxes in the remote Owyhee Mountains on the Oregon/Idaho  border. The film captures the dedication of this conservationist as he monitors every stage of the breeding process from nest building to egg laying, hatching, and finally the fledgling of the bluebird chicks. While celebrating the    success of this remarkable man, the film addresses the struggle to inspire the next generation of citizen scientists.

This film is being sponsored by North Central Washington Audubon Society.

For more information, go to: Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center

Mar
18
10:30 am10:30

Padilla Bay Hawk Watch for Families with Children

Free program for families with children ages 6-9 years old.

Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
10441 Bayview-Edison Road
Mount Vernon, WA 98273-9668

Learn about all the hawks that live in the Skagit Valley. Bring coat, hat, and binoculars if you have them–or borrow ours.

This program is offered twice, March 17 & 18, from 10:30 to 12:00.

Reserve your FREE program space at the Padilla Bay Everbrite Site

Mar
18
9:00 am09:00

Snoqualmie Community Forest Restoration Volunteer Event

Location: Cottonwood Forest: 7323 Douglas Ave SE Snoqualmie, WA 98065

Looking for a way to give back to your community? Join the newly formed Green Snoqualmie Partnership in improving the habitat of the Cottonwood Forest green space by planting native trees and shrubs and spreading mulch to add nutrients back to the forest. Restoration work parties are a great way to give back to meet new neighbors, spend time outside, burn calories, and contribute something positive to your community!

What to bring: Come dressed to work outside (rain or shine) with sturdy shoes. Bring a water bottle to stay hydrated. Tools, work gloves, light snacks and coffee provided. Youth volunteers: If you are under 18 and attending the event without a parent or guardian, please come to the event with a Youth Waiver signed by a parent or guardian. Email us at info@greensnoqualmie.org to receive the waiver. We will also have youth waivers at the event. RSVP for the event by contacting info@greensnoqualmie.org / 425-238-0065

Learn More: www.greensnoqualmie.org

The Green Snoqualmie Partnership is the newest partnership in the Green Cities network. Its partners include Forterra, the City of Snoqualmie, King Conservation District, the Snoqualmie Tribe, the Snoqualmie Ridge ROA, King County, Mountains to Sound Greenway, and the Snoqualmie Valley Watershed Forum. The Green Snoqualmie Partnership’s vision is an engaged community caring for healthy natural areas and forested open spaces in the city to protect Snoqualmie’s heritage and valuable natural resources for current and future generations to enjoy.

Mar
17
10:30 am10:30

Padilla Bay- Families with Children Hawk Watch

Free program for families with children ages 6-9 years old.

Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
10441 Bayview-Edison Road
Mount Vernon, WA 98273-9668

Learn about all the hawks that live in the Skagit Valley. Bring coat, hat, and binoculars if you have them–or borrow ours.

This program is offered twice, March 17 & 18, from 10:30 to 12:00.

Reserve your FREE program space at the Padilla Bay Everbrite Site

Mar
16
9:00 am09:00

Eastern Washington Regional Science & Engineering Fair

We are excited to announce the Spokane STEMposium has transitioned into the Eastern Washington Regional Science and Engineering Fair (EWRSEF). We are continuing the tradition of hosting an annual science and engineering competition to support STEM competency in our community, but there a few things that will be different.

What's Changed?

  • Participants must reside in an Eastern Washington County - Spokane, Whitman, Lincoln, Stevens, Ferry, Pend Oreille.
  • All projects must have an adult sponsor - this can be your teacher, a scientist, or another adult with a science background.
  • Eligible students must be in grades 6-12.
  • All participants can advance to the Washington State Science and Engineering Fair .
  • The number of projects will be limited so register early.
  • Select winners in grades 9-12 will be eligible to attend the International Science and Engineering Fair!
  • Select winners in grades 6-8 will be eligible to attend Broadcom MASTERS
  • All presentations must be done on poster board; no more PowerPoints!
  • In lieu of writing a paper, students will need to keep and display a chronological research journal.
  • Students can work individually or with a two to three person team.
  • Lunch will no longer be provided.  There will be places to buy lunch on campus.

For more information, Click Here.

Mar
13
5:30 pm17:30

Tidal Energy, Ocean Acidification, and Melting Sea Ice

UW Science Now: Molly Grear, Emma Hodgson, and Maddie Smith
Location: Seattle Town Hall
Downstairs at Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Avenue (enter on Seneca Street)
Seattle, Washington 98101

Oceans cover more than 70 percent of our planet’s surface and make up more than 95 percent of earth’s water. The impacts of pollution and global warming on these massive bodies of water have the potential to affect us all. UW students Emma Hodgson and Maddie Smith will discuss their investigations into the impacts of human behavior and global warming on our oceans, specifically acidification and melting sea ice. Engineering student Molly Grear will discuss the ways tidal energy can be used to mitigate these effects.

For more information, go to: https://townhallseattle.org/event/